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New report: How to overcome barriers to implement recommendations for youth injury prevention: The Case of Road Traffic Injuries  print friendly

04/17/2009 This report aims to serve as a useful guide for policy makers, injury prevention researchers and safety practitioners wishing to effectively design and implement road traffic

safety interventions targeting adolescents and young adults. The first part of the report aims to assess the impact of risk-taking behaviour on road crash involvement among University students. The second part of the report applies qualitative methodology to explore youth’s perceived barriers to the adoption of safety measures.

Each year, road traffic injuries claim the lives of more than 50,000 European Union citizens, approximately 11,000 of whom are youngsters aged from 15 to 24 years. Adolescents and young adults constitute a vulnerable group of road users as their developmental stage does not allow them to fully comprehend or demonstrate the needed proficiency in identifying, appreciating and avoiding the hazards of the road environment.

This report, ‘How to overcome barriers to implement recommendations for youth injury prevention: The Case of Road Traffic Injuries’ aims to serve as a useful guide for policy makers, injury prevention researchers and safety practitioners wishing to effectively design and implement road traffic safety interventions targeting adolescents and young adults.

The report is divided into parts, the first of which aims to assess the impact of risk-taking behaviour on road crash involvement among university students and presents findings from a survey utilizing an internet based, health assessment tool titled “Student’s Health Card”. The second part of the report applies qualitative methodology to explore youth’s perceived barriers to the adoption of safety measures, while providing a conceptual framework for guiding large-scale educational campaigns.

The provision of an estimation tool for the assessment of risky behaviours resulting to road crash involvement seems to enable collection of reliable data and generation of appropriate educational feedback to adolescents and young adults. Furthermore, results stemming from qualitative research offer a deeper understanding on the attitudes of youth regarding road traffic injury prevention.

The report concludes that focus group encounters can play an important role in the planning and implementation of public health programs. The experience gained through both qualitative and quantitative work could contribute to the development of tailored health education messages or targeted educational initiatives aiming to reduce risky driving behaviours of this age group and promote road safety.

Source and more info: This report has been produced within the framework of the APOLLO project, ‘Strategies and best practices for the reduction of injuries’, led by the University of Athens. The report is available at: http://www.eurosafe.eu.com/csi/eurosafe2006.nsf/wwwVwContent/l4wp3results.htm and  http://www.euroipn.org/apollo/WP3.htm

3 NEW WEB TOOLS TO CALCULATE THE DIRECT MEDICAL COSTS OF INJURY

The web tools are SPSS scripts/syntaxes and have been developed to analyse, harmonize, aggregate and merge hospital-based data for the calculation of direct medical costs. A manual with guidelines is available which explains the methods for data analysis of hospital-based surveillance data and gives a description of the collection, harmonisation and analysis of data on injury incidence and related healthcare consumption and costs.

Available at: http://www.eurosafe.eu.com/csi/eurosafe2006.nsf/wwwVwContent/l4wp2results.htm

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